Toxic

Toxic is a word I seem to be hearing a lot more lately.  It’s original meaning applied solely to substances or chemicals that were dangerous to people.  But it has now been widely applied, in the figurative sense, to include such things as relationships and workplaces.  When you think about it this way, there are many types of “toxins” when it comes to individual beliefs or behaviors including hatred, envy, bigotry, racism, and sexism, just to name a few.  I could be wrong, but I don’t image that a single dose of a particular person or a job could outright kill you, but maybe the stress of such encounters could, over time.  Of course, there are those jobs that can expose a person directly to toxic substances, and those could definitely kill you and kill you instantly.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has numerous definitions of what constitutes a toxic or highly toxic substance.  OSHA relies on the LD50 for it’s classifications.  This stands for the Lethal Dose or amount of a solid or liquid material that it takes to kill 50% of the test animals it’s used on.  This same measurement, frighteningly enough, is used when testing medications.  I don’t know about you, but I don’t want to be a test subject, voluntarily or involuntarily, taking a 50-50, live or die gamble on handling or ingesting some chemical at work, or a medication my doctor prescribes, especially if the lethal doses they are talking about are only in milligrams or parts per million.

I wonder if there is an LD50 for doses of people or personalities 🙂

Now I usually don’t endorse programs or products and the like, but I have to say that I’ve enjoyed a couple of series this past week.  I watched the docuseries on Netflix called “Rotten,” which addresses multiple issues with modern agricultural industry practices including international market coercion, blind-eye regulation or unregulation, monocrop culture, use of toxic chemicals and crime.  I’ve also been watching the docuseries “Broken Brain” that is examining the effects of multiple environmental insults on the body, the diseases that manifest, and a functional approach to cure.

The common theme is these programs, and more and more literature I see as well, is that humans are starting to reap what they’ve sown.  We have violently exploited and poisoned the planet, and vast arrays of illnesses are starting to increase exponentially as a result.  The outdated algorithmic medical model of name it and pick a drug to treat symptoms is failing because it is simply not getting to the cause of these illnesses.  And because the causes can be multiple toxin exposures over time, it may not be easy to put your finger on the exact source and where to target treatment.  So, when I see people talking about eliminating the negative or toxic influences in their lives, and by that they usually mean toxic relationships, we might want to add to that list detoxing our planet and our bodies.

As you may have noticed, I have a number of categories of postings on my blog.  Soon, I’ll be adding a new one – “Environmental,” where I hope we can explore some of the issues where we can all truly make a healthy difference in the way live, breath, work and relate . . . it starts by shinning a light on them.

***

Postscript:  I kicked off this section by reblogging a piece from Nipslip titled: “Having an Eco-Conscience. Does it Matter and Is It Even Possible.

*  Photo Credit:  I found this photo on the Internet in the public domain and was unable to locate a source to give an attribution, but this one is not mine.

Another update:  There is a free web-presentation series coming up on Heavy Metals beginning January 29th through February 5th, 2018.  You can register to watch these presentations at the “Heavy Metal Summit: Detox Demystified.”

Update – January 30, 2018. I have to give Netflix credit again for launching another docuseries “Dirty Money,” which is exposing corporate fraud.  The first episode exposed Volkswagen’s deception on how their diesel cars, advertised and sold as “clean” were, in fact, some of the worse polluters adding to the toxins we breathe.

Update – February 3, 2018: You might want to reconsider what foods you are eating, especially cereals and snack foods that are composed largely of major mono-cropped grains.

“A FDA-registered food safety laboratory tested iconic American food for residues of the weed killer glyphosate (aka Monsanto’s Roundup) and found ALARMING amounts.”

Check out the article: “Monsanto is Scrambling to Bury This Breaking Story.”

Update – August 19, 2018:  I’m back to endorse another docuseries put together by Netflix.  It is called “Afflicted” and it follows the lives of seven people struggling with environmental or mysterious illnesses.  This includes Multiple Chemical Sensitivity, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, also called Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, Electro-Magnetic Sensitivity; Toxic Mold Syndrome; and Lyme Disease.  All of which can be tied to our ever increasing poisoning of the planet.

These disease processes can be devastating for the sufferers and their families.  And for most, the mainstream medical community has abandoned those afflicted.  When they figure out a way to make a profit, I’m sure they will rise to the occasion.

The hyperlink above will take you to the trailer if you’re interested.  Kudos to Netflix for taking on this subject matter.

 

Move Your Body, Move Your Mind

Yesterday, I didn’t post anything in my category “Daily Musings.”  And that’s ok.  As writers, we don’t always get things on paper, or we may be working on multiple projects and simply not make it to the blog.  Of course, there are times when the well just goes dry.  No words.  What do we do then?  It’s pointless to get frustrated, so you might as well free up your mind by doing something else.

In the book, “Brain Rules,” by John Medina, he talks about how our evolutionary past affects our thinking and creativity today.  The first of his twelve rules is to exercise, and he outlines the “performance envelope” where “our brains are designed to solve problems, related to surviving, in an unstable outdoor environment, and to do so in nearly constant motion.”  Yes, motion.

From an evolutionary view, our brains developed while we were on the move – walking as many as twelve miles each day.  Constant motion was necessary to forage for food, water, and to scurry away from predators.  While these skills may have deteriorated in an age where some only get their exercise by walking to the vending machine, no longer fearing that saber-tooth tigers might surprise them on the well-worn carpet path to the office break room, multiple studies have borne out that exercise increases our cognitive abilities.  And it doesn’t matter what type of exercise as long as gets the blood flowing.  More circulating oxygen to the brain transforms to increases in substances promoting and enhancing brain activity and even stimulating the grown of new brain cells.  This is why sitting in a class room or an office has the opposite effect of making our brains grow tired and numb.  Moving increases brain power.  Moving stimulates creativity.

Now you don’t have to walk twelve miles every day, but motion is good.  Any motion.  I’ve found its best to carry something to jot down those ideas while I’m on the trail, or use the voice recorder on the cell phone.  Because once I start moving, and take my mind off writing, words just magically appear.

Yesterday it was 4 miles out in the woods. I wrote a lot in my mind that will hopefully be on paper soon.  Today, my chosen activity was cleaning house.  And as I did, numerous ideas for numerous stories kept popping up in my mind.  So many ideas and words that my house cleaning was disrupted by many returns to the keyboard.  Or maybe I just didn’t want to clean.  I don’t know.  But, if you want to forage for words, move your body . . .

***

The Mythical Arrowhead

This piece was published under the title of “Found Your Arrowhead? Seek This Counsel In The Natural World,” in The Urban Howl on November 8, 2017.   I highly recommend you check out this wonderful online publication at http://theurbanhowl.com/.  I have since completed a more expansive version of this article.  If you would like to read it, let me know in a comment.

“Found Your Arrowhead? Seek This Counsel In The Natural World”

by Harold Stearley

Knowing, or believing, something exists doesn’t mean that you will find It, or that you should search for It.

As with many people I know, the past couple of years have been a time of great change, of searching, a call to become whole again. We have searched and found before, but we’ve lost pieces of our soul going through the grinder of daily existence in a world that values the material over the spiritual, that places labels over substance, illusion over reality.

My current search began with the “dissolving” of a marriage and the loss of a career by forces seemingly outside the realm of personal control. Or did I somehow manifest this destruction to force myself to rediscover my true nature? The answer to that question is now irrelevant to the path I walk.

The marriage hit a melting point when my wife evolved into an end-stage alcoholic and nothing could persuade her to seek treatment.

The career flame was extinguished as the result of internal office politics – I would not succumb to playing their corrupt games – outsiders and misfits are usually left outside, perhaps with a note begging for adoption.

So now what, where do I go from here?

Where do all of us go from a starting point of what we perceive is darkness and despair – a contraction of space and time? Do you start believing the crowd of voices in your head entrenched there from years of social “domestication,” the “mitote” as the Toltecs call it, telling you that you are not good enough, not beautiful enough, not smart enough, don’t make enough – the ever-gnawing feelings of inadequacy – the ever-present need to acquire more? More what?

Will all of the “shoulds” injected into your mind from the moment of your first breath predominate every step you take – fill every “rational” conscious thought? Will the search for a definition and identity of your ego be satiated by finding a new label?

Will another hollow paycheck somehow provide “meaning” to the fabricated definition of who you are? Will the ever-turning wheels in your mind condemn you to the prison of living in the past and in future projections, instead of experiencing the here and now?

Perhaps it’s time to awaken to the fact that the true journey is inward. Answers, awareness, enlightenment, and true happiness do not come from external sources.

My search began externally with looking for a new job, a new living location, perhaps a new partner. After a year of re-learning to live alone, of constant rejection of job applications, and upon finding defects with every possible living location I explored, I woke from my slumbers. I awakened to realize that I was enjoying, in the present moment, the things that had come to fill my time.

The daily ventures into nature, the meditation of motion and stillness, the re-connection with “reality.” The “real world” that surrounds us is filled with infinite riches and beauty, which most overlook. Like the caterpillar, I was transforming. I was repossessing what I had lost.

Upon achieving some balance, real magick begins to happen. New connections materialize. Some of these connections are there to show you that you’re on the right path, others to show you what to avoid. Your intuition is developed. Just like the mole who has sacrificed vision in return for all its other senses becoming heightened, you sacrifice illusion, a life style, possessions, sometimes even rationality, in exchange to feel and experience truth, to know in your heart what nourishes your soul.

False messages still come and can gain intensity; beckoning you to return to the land of illusion.

The bait to step back into that world of darkness and confusion can take many forms. In my case, I am presented with a job opportunity, which has now acquired a sense of oddness since the beginning of this walk when I spent hours seeking some job that was seemingly always beyond grasp. And, as I mechanically prepare for an interview, I ask, why now?

To contemplate this change in direction, a possible new path that could really be a return to an old one that no longer serves, I seek out counsel with the natural world.

It has never misled me or given me false promises. I hike. I find myself standing in a creek bed, surrounded by the sound and essence of moving water and by hundreds of thousands of pieces of limestone and chert. Chert is a very hard silicate-based, sedimentary stone that when struck forcefully enough and at the right angle produces conchoidal fractures with extremely sharp edges.

Most people know the variety of chert called flint that can give rise to fire – a powerful nature indeed – that of transformation, illumination, or destruction. Because of its fracturing qualities, chert was also the perfect stone for the Natives to craft arrow and spearheads and other cutting tools – sharp as a razor and stronger than steel.

I know as I stand here, contemplating and seeking guidance, that there is an Arrowhead among these stones.

Missouri Creek - Rocks

It is a given that rivers, streams and creeks are the best places to find them, where the earth has been eroded by the waters – the feminine universal womb, the source of all potentialities. Many treasures are revealed by the waters’ power to purify. And a natural curiosity, plus a desire to acquire such a power object, sparks the urge to hunt for it, to search it out, to discover its mystery. Being more intuitive now, however, I ask, what is the real message I’m receiving? And why did this imagery suddenly pop into my mind from nowhere? Time to consult the symbolism and ancient wisdom of the Earth.

The Arrowhead is said to represent the hunter and adventurer in each of us, as well as alertness, for it takes a good eye and strong arm to use a bow and arrow. It is also believed to indicate protection and courage and to signify direction, force, movement, and power.

Arrows pointed in opposite directions meant war, while a broken arrow meant peace, and crossed arrows meant friendship. Arrows are piecing, representing the masculine. The flight of arrows can symbolize the accent to the celestial. And an arrow, once let loose from the bow, results in consequences that cannot be undone, whether the arrow hits or misses its intended target.

As I stood there in that creek bed reflecting, I couldn’t help but notice the obvious. I was not moving in any direction. I was static. To stare and search for this Mythical Arrowhead amongst a million other stones, is not advancement down any path. The Arrowhead is not mythical in the sense of being a falsehood, it does exist. And, it is not some traditional story involving supernatural beings that somehow speaks to the psychology, or customs, or ideals of a society either. Rather, it serves as an allegory – not a cold definition but full of warmth in its meaning.

I could spend many hours being static in a search that produces no results, that hits no target, that creates little more than frustration. This speaks a little to the past years’ events. Or one might find the Arrowhead, secure it to the shaft and let it fly, it’s effects being unchangeable.

It may miss the intended mark and not fall on the path of enlightenment and happiness. But even if it hits the target aimed for, if that target is based on illusion and false “shoulds” that bring no spiritual advancement, then you’ve hit no target at all. You have to have both, a proper path or target, and you must lodge that arrow squarely in that target with a clean shot. So, if you’ve found the target, then, perhaps, it is truly worth the search to find the arrow to strike it.

But, the real message I believe I’m receiving is not to seek out something mythical with a false believe of attaining Bodhi in a place external to your soul. And once one realizes that, and takes the inward journey instead, then perhaps there is no reason to seek out the Arrowhead and all its power at all, perhaps we’ve already found it.

***

Arrowhead

Seeding, Misleading, Switching, and Stealing: The Vocabulary of Competition in Today’s Pharmaceutical Industry

* Disclaimers:  The image for this post was found on the internet in the public domain and it is in no way identified or affiliated with any entity or particular drug manufacturer.  While the article references specific companies in relation to a Wall Street Journal publication, it is in no way implying those companies, or any other specific companies, have engaged in the practices identified by Dr. Kessler, former Commissioner of the FDA, which are described in this article.

** This article was published in the editorial sections of the Columbia Missourian on July 12, 1995 and in the Columbia Daily Tribune on July 18, 1995.  Please see my Daily Musings post called “Detours” for an introduction to this flash from the past.

Recently, the Wall Street Journal reported that several pharmaceutical companies increased their donations to the GOP to influence legislation that ultimately saved them $1 billion dollars.  It seems Abbott Laboratories, Bristol-Meyers Squibb and American Home Products donated more “soft-money” to the Republicans this past year than the previous six years combined in an effort to eliminate rebates to the government from the sale of infant formula to the Women, Infants and Children program.  Paying off legislators, however, is just one method of dominating the pharmaceutical market, and these corporations go to great lengths to promote products that are much more lethal than infant formula.

More than $58 billion a year is reaped by the U.S. pharmaceutical companies, but each individual company commands only a small share of this monetary battlefield.  Merck and Co., for example, controls the largest market share, dominating only 6.2 percent of the industry.  The fact that each drug manufacturer controls such a small portion or total pharmaceutical revenues fuels fierce competition to influence your physician to prescribe, or misprescribe, medications.  David Kessler of the Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research cites increasing evidence of illicit drug marketing practices that mislead or literally buy physicians’ prescribing practices.

One such technique is called a “seeding trial.”  The company identifies physicians, not based on qualifications, but by their habits of prescribing competitors’ products.  These doctors are then enticed to prescribe a given medication by signing them on for a drug trial of no scientific value.  Already FDA-licensed, these drugs require no additional studies.  The only criteria for participation is the physician’s willingness to write prescriptions.  Little to no data is collected, and no control groups are used to compare effects of medications.  The physician is paid a flat fee for each patient enrolled, which usually varies from $85 to $500 a head.  Essentially, these false studies are designed to change a doctor’s prescribing habits to a medication with no appreciable benefits to the patients involved.  In a marketing memo intercepted by the FDA, one company highlighted the importance of one such trial in this manner: “If at least 20,000 of the 25,000 patients enrolled remain in the study, it could mean up to a $10,000,000 boost in sales.”

This type of payment for questionable research has resulted in other problems.  In his article “Institutional Conflicts of Interest,” Ezekiel Emanuel documented that institutions and physicians receiving royalties and payments associated with drug research were more likely to fail to provide informed consent; to ignore adverse reactions and complications endangering their subjects; and to introduce bias into the collection and interpretation of data.  If drug companies are eliciting false drug trials and physicians are altering results based on payment for these studies, how can any patient trust that [they are] being prescribed the correct product for [their] ailment?

If physicians cannot be coerced into false studies to change their prescribing habits, then drug companies simply misrepresent the benefits of their products.  Unsubstantiated claims of superiority, minimizing or failing to mention risk and adverse reactions or presenting pharmacokinetic distinctions with dubious relevance are all part of a well-orchestrated false advertising campaign.  A study conducted at the University of San Diego School of Medicine demonstrated that, at best, pharmaceutical representatives were only 89 percent accurate in their advertising statements.  This 11 percent falsification of data could be all it takes for your physician to prescribe a lethal combination of medications.

If “seeding and misleading” can’t get your physician into the manufacturer’s camp, then how about the “switch campaign?”  Insurance companies encourage the use of cheaper generic drugs to hold down health-care costs.  To avoid this loss of revenue, however, pharmaceutical corporations offer direct payments to physicians to “switch” to another dosage form of the same product or to another product in the same therapeutic class.  No real benefit surfaces for the patient, but now there is no generic substitute for the switched classification and no loss of profits for the manufacturer.

If all of this doesn’t make you reach for your antacid, then consider the newest trend in the pharmaceutical industry: stealing.  Drug companies are trying to create alliances with insurers that will allow them to guide the patients’ care, provide their medications and bypass the physician altogether.  A nurse would monitor the patient by phone while hospital and physician visits are discouraged.  The drug company would provide only its products, eliminating the physician’s option to decide form a wide range of medications.  I guess “stealing” prescriptive authority is certainly one way to eliminate the competition, but then again just who is practicing medicine here, and whose interest do you think these companies are representing?

In the Nov. 15 issue of Hospital Practice, Robert Schrier documented a drug-dosing crisis in America that accounts for 60,000 to 140,000 unnecessary death each year.  Adverse reactions resulted in 10.8 percent of all hospitalizations and 14 percent of all in-patient hospital days, and once hospitalized there was an additional 18 to 30 percent chance of experiencing and adverse drug event.  Medication producing dizziness and sedation in the elderly population caused 32,000 hip fractures last year, and potentially life-threatening mixtures of medications were found in 88 percent of all elderly patients prescribed three or more medications.  Prescription medications, taken the way they are ordered, account for more deaths each year than guns (35,000), than high risk sexual behavior (30,000) or even motor vehicle accidents (25,000).  In fact, each year prescription medications kill more people than the entire 16 years of the Vietnam War, during which we lost 57,147 Americans.  With these types of statistics, it is not very comforting to know that our drug manufacturers are illicitly influence the way our doctors treat our ailments.

***

Kessler, D. A., et. al. (1994).  Therapeutic Class Wars – Drug Promotion in a Competitive                        Marketplace.  The New England Journal of Medicine, 331(20), 1350- 1353.

 

Photo:  This photo was found on the Internet in the public domain.  No other attribution could be found.

Update June 3, 2018: It looks like nothing has changed since 1994, except there are probably more zeros after the profit margins of Big Pharma.  Check it out: “Why Prescription Drugs Cost So Much.”  All links are subject to link rot.

 

Time – A Wound Healer or A Defense to Wrongful Death

By Harold Stearley

Not too long ago, the Missouri Supreme Court encountered two homicide cases where family members brought actions for the wrongful death of loved ones. One case involved a woman dying from multiple gunshot wounds in her home. The other was a consolidation of five cases involving five patients in a medical center that allegedly died at the hands of a respiratory therapist. Both cases involved homicides that were not the result of negligence, recklessness or passion – they were, by definition, murders. Both cases involved civil wrongful death actions, separate from any criminal prosecutions, that were filed after the three-year statute of limitations for wrongful death actions had passed. 

In the gunshot case, the trial court denied a motion to dismiss asserting the case was time-barred, but in the medical center cases the trial courts involved granted the hospital’s motions to dismiss on this same basis. The gunshot murder and the five consolidated medical murder cases ended up in the state’s highest court to determine whether the doctrine of equitable estoppel tolled the statute of limitations because the defendants had allegedly, fraudulently concealed their wrongdoing causing the plaintiff family members to miss the statute of limitations for bringing their claims.

The high court, however, delivered two different and opposing decisions. In the gunshot case, the court held the common law (judicially-created) doctrine of equitable estoppel applied, and the court upheld the circuit court’s denial of the motion to dismiss. But where the medical center allegedly concealed the facts from the family members (the facts supporting the claim were discussed in detail in the dissenting opinion), the high court affirmed the circuit courts’ grants of the motions to dismiss stating the common law doctrine did not apply. Both decisions were handed-down on the same day – August 18, 2015.

So what’s the difference? In one case one supreme court judge did not participate and a special judge sat on the bench. Did a one judge replacement result in opposite outcomes? While this could spark a whole range of discussions regarding the judicial process, I’ll leave that to other commentators. What I think is a tragedy is that, it appears the medical center prevailed by concealing the facts surrounding the suspected murders of five of its patients by one of its employees. In this case, the statute of limitations certainly matched the slang meaning of the abbreviation “SOL.” Time does not always heal all wounds. Sometimes time allows you to escape liability. . . 

***

See: State ex rel. Beisly v. Perigo, 469 S.W.3d 434 (Mo. banc 2015) and Boland v. Saint Luke’s Health Sys., Inc., 471 S.W.3d 703, 704-07 (Mo. banc 2015).

 *Photo Credit:  I found this image on the Internet in the Public Domain.  I was unable to find an attribution to the source, but it is not my photo.

 

 

 

Writing’s a Bitch, So is Soul Searching

By Harold Stearley

This article appeared in The Urban Howl on January 10, 2018

http://theurbanhowl.com/

Warning: This might get heavy. If you don’t like reading more than 140 characters stop now. If you don’t like introspection and self-examination, turn around. If you don’t like thinking about the writing life, expansion of consciousness, freedom or soul searching, well you know…

We all know it, writing is a bitch.

Some days, while standing in the line at the grocery store, the words just flow, like we are channeling from the Universe, and we’re scrambling for a piece of paper before they’re gone. We know that they can never be recalled in the exact fashion we first held them.

Other days, we sit staring at the screen and nothing comes, the mind is numb. And some days, you just need to jump in the car and drive 1400 miles to that cabin in the middle of nowhere to kill off all of the distractions, to force yourself inward, to open the gate, to find the words, your true voice and, similarly, to find your soul.

I just completed the drive.

I do a lot of driving in the early morning hours. Up at 1:00, out the door by 2:00. You can cover a lot of distance before the rest of the world is stirring. But there’s an eerie quality to driving at that time of day, depending on where you’re at. Good highways, good lighting, good signage, city lights, and especially the moon can all be warming — they add definition to that dark and empty landscape.

But then the navigator wants to save you some time and you’re off on that two-lane, undivided highway, with no shoulders, no lights, few reflectors, and sometimes no center lines, and you wonder what the hell are you going to run up on as you fly down that gray ribbon at 70 miles per hour, give or take.

So, I latched onto a truck, a single, box-like entity sharing this 100-mile radius. I know that guy will light the road ahead of me, and he’s going in my direction. I can tell he is following his navigator too — headed straight for the left-hand turn we are both supposed to take down that next stretch of lonely highway.

He comes to a stop, no turn is there; a concrete barrier instead. We both sit in silence, then slowly head down the road a mile, execute a U-turn and come back to where the mysterious road is supposed to be, but this time from the other direction. A right turn appears and we are headed south.

I guess navigators don’t see all of the barriers — neither do we, especially the ones we create for ourselves.

As we speed away, I suddenly see a blast of dust kick up on the roadway. The trucker’s trailer, blowing sideways in the high winds, dipped off the edge of the road into the dirt. The trailer heaves up to the right as the dirt grabs hold of the tires, left-sided tires leave the pavement, skyward bound. I thought it might flip, but it doesn’t roll. He somehow pulls it back on the road. I’m glad for him.

Time to back off a bit, back into the darkness. Sometimes we spend time there figuratively as well, avoiding our own light.

Our minds are jealous beasts. They want to control the environment, to tell you what it is you are seeing and experiencing, but there is little you can see in this time and place. The mind wants to fill the darkness, fill that void with something familiar — give it shape, give it form. And so it does.

Outlines of mountains that aren’t really there. Cloud formations. The moon, three-quarters full, slowly becomes round and full — the circle complete, but then it sets. You realize these things aren’t there and you still can’t really tell where you are going. Nothing but headlights punching a momentary hole in the darkness and tail lights glowing red behind.

Nothing in front of you and nothing behind you beyond where those lights can reach, where their rays dissipate, swallowed by the night. You hold on for dawn and pray for it. And when it finally comes, when those first slivers of light pierce the darkness, you’ve traveled some 300 miles and you awake in a different landscape. No longer the flat Texas panhandle.

Instead, there are mountains and cacti and desert chaparral. A freight train appears to the east momentarily dissecting the plain and the road, from the mountains. You instinctively count cars, register if they’re carrying grain or coal. It’s hard to shut that brain off.

But the new world floods your senses and it is pleasingly disorienting. It stops the mind, the internal dialog. All you can do is experience, take it all in. Time and space have expanded from the simple act of driving out of your boundaries. You see, people’s worlds seem to be in a constant state of contraction.

When we were children we experienced those endless days of summer because we lived freely in the here and now. Our imaginations raced, we played, we observed, we wondered, we were always wowed. Nothing was taken for granted. We weren’t reined in by fabricated definitions or borders. The sky could be red if we wanted it to be. We played in foreign lands. The thickets and woods were a jungle. A cat, a mountain lion. We weren’t bound by math or history or science, only the limits of our senses and what we could dream up. Our worlds expanded. Time stood still.

The essence changed slightly in our teens. Still free of societal responsibilities, we became invincible. Play took different forms, sometimes more dangerous, stretching the limits, but there was always laughter. We swung the world by its tail. We owned the here and now.

But as we age, the boundaries and borders come. We have been force-fed society’s definitions and bound by its rules. We are assigned roles to play. Told dreams aren’t real, and never can be. We are given work. Our identities narrow. Time and space begin to contract. Our worlds shrink. At first to a community sphere, family and friends, a home and job, and eventually a smaller home when the kids have grown, then a room as we become feeble, and then gone.

We fill our shrinking world with distractions and we’ve created massive amounts of media to do just that. Television, movies, computers, social media, smartphones — these all make us feel like we are interacting with a larger universe. No longer confined to that commute to and from work in a box on wheels, in a ten-by-twelve living room, in that eight-by-eight office space. These prisons without bars.

If we’re lucky, and perhaps diligent, we can maintain some of that childlike view of the world. We might even travel while our bodies are able, and we should. Travel expands space and time. Travel, breaking out of our self-imposed boxes, is freedom. Freedom to experience anew.

One thing we seem to want to avoid, that is always available to us, is that inward journey. We are always filling our voids with outside experiences, seeking solutions outside of ourselves, searching for another person to be with, anything to keep from looking inside. Not all of the external is bad, and it should still be pursued.

We are social animals, and the unfamiliar internal world can be frightening. And so, we often do anything we can to avoid truly engaging in introspection and self-examination, figuring out who you are, and exploring the soul.

It can be painful work.

Some even lose themselves to a communal identity. They speak in clichés and platitudes, and they exercise as little independent thought as possible. They meld in. They try not to think or reason, punch the time clock and become a job, wrap their identity up in an external definition.

“I am a mother, a father, a teacher, a wife, a husband, a homeowner, a gardener, a doctor, a forklift driver.”

They don’t mention that they’re a spirit soul. Or that they’re here to find a soul purpose. Or that they’re preparing for a spiritual life after the body is gone.

People will do anything to avoid their true self. And if you start down that road of soul-seeking, you won’t come back to the mundane world of clichés, you won’t be “right as rain,” or “roll with the punches,” or “go with the flow”.

What you will be is authentic. You’ll see with a clarity that you’ve never had before. You’ll be true to your word. You will feel the world’s vibrations, sense its moments.

Your intuition will magnify, you’ll know people before you meet them. You’ll know your own heart. You’ll feel it when another beats in synch with yours.

So I drove. Travel, motion through the external world, tears down walls, eliminates those borders, returns us to the world of no boundaries, frees our imagination, takes back our minds, and recharges our spirits.

It’s back to that endless summer, clouds that form faces and animals, feeling the grass between my toes, living in the here and now, no distractions from the expansive world around me. I can look into my soul here, for when the world expands, it expands in all directions, including inward.

Funny thing, I was stopped by the Border Patrol — literally this time instead of figuratively — and I had to declare where I was coming from and where I was going. I could just imagine that officer’s reaction if I had told him I was coming from the world of illusion and going to the real world, the place where the spirit roams free.

Our bodies will eventually fail, our worlds will contract, and freedom of movement will be gone. We’ll be trapped inside with only ourselves for a while. We might want to get to know our real selves, make that spiritual journey inward, and free the spirit before that happens. Why wait to be dancing in the light?

***

* Photo:  This was one of my one-handed, over-the-shoulder, while driving pics 🙂

Consciousness

Consciousness has many definitions, ranging from being awake and aware of one’s surroundings, to being aware of something within oneself, or simply being aware of your own existence.  Consciousness can be viewed from an individual perspective or a collective one.

Carl Jung spoke of unconsciousness.  The personal unconscious embodied all repressed, forgotten, or subliminally perceived experiences.  And the collective unconscious refers to things shared among all being of the same species.  For humans, Jung believed these elements were composed of instincts and archetypes.

post

I recently read an article in the journal of Behavioral Sciences titled: Carl Gustav Jung, Quantum Physics and the Spiritual Mind: A Mystical Vision of the Twenty-First Century, authored by Diogo Valadas Ponte and Lothar Schafer.  The authors did a great job of weaving spirituality, psychology, science, and philosophy together – a quantum view of the spiritual wave form and its many potentialities.  Yes, you can be in two places at once.

One might more colorfully refer to this as examining the metaconsciousness – a state of being where the border between physical reality and spiritual existence dissolves.

This blog will wander down the pathways of consciousness and all it forms and manifestations – the way it is expressed or exploited by humans.  Philosophy, law, the environment, health care, spirituality, politics, poetry, dreaming, meditating,  journeying, and just plain old-fashioned storytelling.  It’s all on the table during this Earthwalk.

***

Photo: Can’t always predict how a camera will capture something – kind of like surprises in life – especially when you point it directly at a light source. For this pic, I used a Canon T1i EOS base with a Promaster Zoom lens set at 400mm, Night Landscape mode, 1 second exposure time, held on a tripod to avoid my shaky hands – And you get Magic

 

%d bloggers like this: